Frequently Asked Questions - Prevailing Wage Laws In Effect: Jan 1, 2010 - Jun 30, 2011

(Some of these answers may be superseded by prevailing wage law changes effective July 1, 2011. )

What is Wisconsin's prevailing wage rate law?
Wisconsin actually has four separate prevailing wage rate laws. Three of the laws cover different types of public works project. Section 66.0903, Wisconsin Statutes, covers projects bid or negotiated by a local governmental unit and projects dedicated to and accepted by a local governmental unit. This law originally was enacted in 1933. Section 103.49, Wisconsin Statutes, covers projects bid by a state agency, except state highway and bridge projects. Section 103.50, Wisconsin Statutes, covers state highway and bridge projects bid by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation. The latter laws originally were enacted in 1931. A new law, Section 66.0904, Wisconsin Statutes, covers private projects that receive direct financial assistance from a local governmental unit.
What is the purpose of these laws?
These laws were enacted to discourage the awarding of public works contracts to employers who frequently underbid local employers by paying their workers substantially less than normally received by workers in an area. Governmental agencies were precluded from awarding contracts exclusively to local employers because various bid laws required that most public works contracts be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder. As wages were the most controllable factor in the bidding process, workers were put in the precarious position of having their wages manipulated by their employer. This problem created instability in the local construction industry. Prevailing wage rate laws were enacted to provide a partial solution to this problem.
What is a "local governmental unit" and give some examples?
A local governmental unit means a political subdivision of Wisconsin (like a school district), a special purpose district (like a utility or sanitary district), an instrumentality or corporation of a political subdivision or special purpose district (like an economic development commission), a combination or subunit of the foregoing, or a regional transit authority (including the southeastern regional transit authority). Additional examples include libraries, fire and EMS districts, wastewater treatment commissions, water utilities, and intergovernmental entities formed under §66.0301, Stats.
What types of projects are covered by the local governmental unit prevailing wage law (§66.0903, Stats.)?
Highway, street, bridge, building or other infrastructure. Projects completed by one local governmental unit for another local governmental unit. A project where the completed facility is leased, purchased, lease purchased or otherwise acquired by, or dedicated to, a local governmental unit instead of the public entity contracting for the construction work. A road, street, bridge, sanitary sewer or water main project where the completed work is acquired by, or dedicated to, a local governmental unit, including ownership or maintenance by the local governmental unit under §236.13(2), Stats.
Are storm sewer facilities (such as detention ponds), bike and pedestrian paths, park facilities built and paid for by a developer and then dedicated to a municipality subject to prevailing wage provisions?
No. Only a road, street, bridge, sanitary sewer, or water main project by a developer that will be dedicated to a local governmental unit for its ownership or maintenance and has a total estimated project cost of at least $25,000 is subject to the prevailing wage law, §66.0903, Stats.
Are there public works projects that do not fall under the local governmental unit prevailing wage law (§66.0903, Stats.)?
Yes. Projects with a total estimated cost of contracted work and materials of less than $25,000 are excluded. A project in which the labor is provided by volunteers does not require a prevailing wage rate determination. The final exclusions are for minor service or maintenance work, warranty work or work under a supply and installation contract.
What is "minor service and maintenance work"?
Minor service and maintenance work for local governmental units, for state agencies, and developers/owners of publicly funded private construction projects includes: minor crack filling, chip or slurry sealing, or other minor pavement patching (not including overlays) that has a projected life span of no longer than 5 years, cleaning drainage or sewer ditches or structures, or any other limited, minor work on public facilities or equipment that is routinely performed to prevent breakdown or deterioration. Minor service and maintenance work for local governmental units and for publicly funded private construction projects also includes the depositing of gravel on an existing gravel road applied solely to maintain the road and road shoulder maintenance.
Do single and double chip seal fall under the “minor service and maintenance work” exception?
If the projected life span of the chip seal is no longer than 5 years, it is minor service and maintenance. Typically, single chip seal projects would fall under the minor service and maintenance exception and do not require a prevailing wage rate determination. However, if a government entity bundles chip seal with a larger project that is subject to prevailing wage, then the single chip seal would be subject to the prevailing wage project determination for the larger project. Double chip seal is not minor service and maintenance because the projected life span exceeds 5 years. A double chip seal project requires a prevailing wage rate determination if the total estimated cost of the project exceeds $25,000.
What is a "supply and installation contract"?
A supply and installation contract is a contract where the material is installed by the supplier, the material is installed by means of simple fasteners or connectors (such as screws or nuts and bolts) and no other work is performed on the site of the project. The total labor cost to install the material cannot exceed 20% of the total cost of the contract.
If a county highway department does construction or reconstruction of town and village highways, bridges and culverts, is this work subject to prevailing wage law?
Work performed by one public entity for another public entity is subject to prevailing wage law if the estimated cost of the complete public works project is at least $25,000. For instance, if a village engages a county highway department to pave a village road, that work is subject to prevailing wage assuming the $25,000 threshold.
If a county highway department does construction or reconstruction for a town or village that is subject to the prevailing wage law (as noted in the prior question), must the county fulfill the prevailing wage reporting requirements?
Under these circumstances, a county highway department is the same as any other contractor on a prevailing wage project. Any contractor on a prevailing wage project must maintain the payroll records required by law, file payroll records electronically with the Department of Workforce Development monthly and submit an Affidavit of Compliance to the contracting agency before receiving final payment for its work on the project.
If a county highway department does snowplowing, brushing, ditch cleaning, and other maintenance work for towns and villages, is this work subject to prevailing wage law?
Snowplowing, brushing & ditch cleaning do not require a prevailing wage rate determination because they fall under the minor service & maintenance work exclusion.
Are infrastructure projects that are acquired by or dedicated to a local governmental unit for ownership or maintenance by the local governmental unit subject to prevailing wage requirements, even if these projects are privately funded?
Some projects are and some projects are not, as noted below.
Exactly what work that is part of a private development is subject to prevailing wage? Is it just road, street, bridge, sanitary sewer, or water main (those items specifically enumerated in the law)?
Yes. Only the listed projects are subject to the law. If that project will be acquired by or dedicated to a local governmental unit for its ownership or maintenance and has a total estimated project cost of at least $25,000 then it must be completed with a prevailing wage rate determination.
Does it include landscaping, site work, storm water work, sidewalks, etc?
No. These types of projects are not listed under this subsection of the law.
How do you "apply" for a prevailing wage project determination?
Complete ERD Form-5719 Application for Prevailing Wage Rate Determination and submit it to the Department of Workforce Development 50-60 days prior to soliciting bids or negotiating a contract for a project. The Application is available on the Prevailing Wage website.

As of January 2011, an on line application is available that permits the requester to immediately print the project determination along with the required attachments without mailing or faxing the application to DWD. You may also call the Equal Rights Division at 608-266-6860 and ask for the "prevailing wage office."
Who is responsible for submission of the application for prevailing wage rate determination?
For a public works project (under §66.0903, Stats. and §103.49, Stats.), the application may be completed and submitted by an authorized official of a local governmental unit or state agency, or by an authorized representative, such as an architect, professional engineer, or construction manager.

For a publicly funded private construction project (under §66.0904, Stats.), the application may be completed and submitted by the owner, investor or developer of the project or by an authorized representative, such as an architect, professional engineer, or construction manager.
If a private developer is required to construct a highway (with estimated cost in excess of $25,000) in a proposed subdivision plat to meet the town or village or city highway/street standards, with the intent that upon completion the town, village, or city will accept the new highway/street as a public street, is the private developer required to follow the prevailing wage rates?
Yes. The local governmental unit should include a provision in its development agreement noting the requirement that facilities that will be dedicated to and accepted by the local governmental unit are subject to prevailing wage law under §66.0903, Stats. Prior to soliciting any bids for the project or negotiating any construction contracts, the local governmental unit or the developer or its authorized representative, must submit a completed Application for a Prevailing Wage Rate Determination (ERD-5719 (01/10)) so that the department can issue a prevailing wage rate determination for the project.
Under the circumstances noted in the prior question, who would apply for the prevailing wage rate determination?
This is a public works project, so the application should be completed and submitted by an authorized official of a local governmental unit or by an authorized representative, such as an architect, professional engineer, or construction manager. While the local governmental unit could require the developer to get the prevailing wage rate determination as a part of the development agreement, under §66.0903, Statutes the local governmental unit ultimately has responsibility for acquiring the project determination.
If a town, village, city, or county is going to perform a public works construction project that has a total estimated cost in excess of $25,000 with its own employees, must these employees be paid the prevailing wage rate?
When a local governmental unit uses its own employees exclusively to complete a public works project, a prevailing wage rate determination is not required for the project. When a local governmental unit uses both its own employees and contracts work to complete a public works project, then a prevailing wage rate determination is required if the total estimated cost of the contracted work and materials on the project is at least $25,000; however under this circumstance, the local governmental unit does not need to pay its own employees the designated prevailing wage rate.
Is a prevailing wage rate determination required if a project is bid without obtaining a prevailing wage rate determination because the total estimated cost was below $25,000, but the low bid was above $25,000?
It depends. Assuming that the estimate was made in good faith and can be documented, if the low bid exceeds the estimate by less than 12%, a prevailing wage rate determination is not required. However, if the low bid exceeds the estimate by more than 12%, a prevailing wage rate determination is required, except under highly unusual circumstances.
If a municipality receives a determination based on project estimates and the actual bids for the project come back under the threshold, can the determination be rescinded?
No. If a prevailing wage rate determination is issued it is in effect. The determination remains in effect even if the low bid is below the minimum threshold of $25,000.
How long does a wage rate remain active?
Once a project determination is issued and the prime contract is awarded before the expiration date listed on the project determination, the project determination remains in effect until the completion of the project.
Is there language that should be used in a development agreement under §236.13(2), Statutes that refers to the prevailing wage laws?
Development agreements typically fall under §66.0903(2), Statutes, rather than the new §66.0904 publicly funded private construction project law. Under §66.0903, Statutes the local governmental unit has the responsibility to obtain the prevailing wage rate determination for the project. While the law does not require that development agreements include prevailing wage language, local governmental units would be well-advised to include such language. The development agreement should include the prevailing wage rate determination as an attachment or refer to the local governmental unit providing this determination at a future date. The local governmental unit could require the developer to get the prevailing wage rate determination as a part of the development agreement; however, the local governmental unit ultimately has responsibility for acquiring the project determination.
Does a copy of the prevailing wage rate determination have to be posted?
The prevailing wage rate determination (also known as "the white sheet") must be posted by the local governmental unit, state agency, developer/owner of a publicly funded private construction project in at least one conspicuous and easily accessible place on the site of the project. If there is no common posting site on a project, a local governmental unit may post a copy of the prevailing wage rate determination at the place normally used to post public notices.
Must employers routinely file electronic payroll records with a local governmental unit or state agency (in addition to the required filing with DWD)?
A contractor on a prevailing wage project must file its payrolls electronically with the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) monthly. The DWD electronic filing requirements are more fully described in the answer to the question: How does an employer/contractor file its payroll records electronically with the Department of Workforce Development? However, as an independent provision, the public entity also may require contractors to file payroll reports with that public entity.
When must an employer file an affidavit of compliance?
All prime contractors must file an affidavit of compliance (ERD-5724) with the local governmental unit, state agency, or owner of a publicly funded private construction project upon completion of the project. All agents or subcontractors must file an affidavit of compliance (ERD-10584) with the prime contractor that awarded them their subcontract. No local governmental unit, state agency or owner/developer of a publicly funded private construction project may authorize a final payment until such an affidavit is filed in proper form and order. Affidavits are not required on state highway and bridge projects (which are under the jurisdiction of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation).
Are local government officials subject to criminal liability under §946.15, Stats., for violating prevailing wage laws?
It is unlikely that a public entity would be criminally liable for violating the prevailing wage law. The more likely scenario is that the public entity would have to make up the difference in wages (assuming there is a difference in wages) to the prime contractor or developer/contractor for failing to notify it of the prevailing wage requirement. Another scenario is that the public entity would be ordered to obtain a prevailing wage rate determination for a project or if that fails that the department would issue a prevailing wage rate determination for the project to the local governmental unit.
For projects that were conceived or bid prior to January 1, 2010, at what point in the timeline of a public project is a prevailing wage rate determination required for a project that has a total projected cost of over $25,000 but less than the 2009 thresholds of $48,000 (for a single trade project) & $234,000 (for a multiple trade project)?
The prevailing wage rate laws that went into effect on January 1, 2010, eliminated any distinction between single and multiple trade projects and created a single project threshold of $25,000. If a Request for Bid was issued or a documented signed/negotiated agreement was completed by December 31, 2009, then the project is subject to 2009 prevailing wage law rather than the new prevailing wage laws that went into effect on January 1, 2010.
How do the new laws affect projects that were under construction in 2009?
Generally speaking, a project that was under construction in 2009 is subject to the local governmental unit or state agency prevailing wage requirements in place in 2009, not those that went into effect in 2010; except with regard to electronic payroll reporting. Effective January 1, 2010, all contractors working on prevailing wage projects are required to comply with the new law to file payroll records electronically with the Department of Workforce Development on a monthly basis. However, all of the following projects required a prevailing wage rate determination in 2009 and will continue to require a determination in future years: a project completed by one local governmental unit for another local governmental unit, a project where the completed facility is leased, purchased, lease purchased, or otherwise acquired by, or dedicated to a local governmental unit in lieu of the local government contracting for the construction work, and a project where the completed work is acquired by, or dedicated to, a local governmental unit, including ownership or maintenance by the local governmental unit under §236.13(2), Stats.
What is a "publicly funded private construction project"?
A construction project where the developer, investor or owner of the project receives at least $1 million of direct financial assistance from a local governmental unit for the erection, construction, repair, remodeling, demolition of a private facility. However, it does not include a housing project that involves any of the following:
  • A residential property, if the project is supported by affordable housing grants, home improvement grants, or grants from a local housing trust fund.
  • A residential property containing four units or less.
  • A residential property that contains retail, office, or commercial components, if the project is intended to increase the supply of affordable housing in a community.
What is "direct financial assistance"?
Money, in the form of a grant or other agreement or included as part of a contract, cooperative agreement, or any other arrangement, including a redevelopment agreement, an economic development agreement, a contract under the Tax Increment Law, or assistance provided under a business improvement district that a local governmental unit provides or directly makes available to assist in the erection, construction, repair, remodeling, demolition of a private facility.
Is there a certain amount of direct financial assistance that must be provided to be subject to prevailing wage requirements as a publicly funded private construction project?
Under §66.0904, Statutes, prevailing wage requirements apply to private construction projects that receive at least $1 million of public funds from a local governmental unit. However, if the project has infrastructure or other facilities that will be constructed, dedicated to and accepted by a local governmental unit and the total estimated project cost of those improvements is at least $25,000, then that portion of the project is subject to prevailing wage law under §66.0903, Statutes (i.e., local governmental unit prevailing wage law).
How do the new laws affect projects that have not been bid out but have an approved development agreement?
Infrastructure projects undertaken as part of a development agreement currently are subject to prevailing wage law, under §66.0903, Statutes, and will continue to be so after 2009. So, if a signed development agreement includes provisions for the developer to dedicate and the local governmental unit to accept infrastructure that type of project currently is subject to prevailing wage law and ought to have a prevailing wage rate determination attached to the project.

If a Request for Bid with regard to the infrastructure that will be dedicated to and accepted by a local governmental unit is issued or a documented signed/negotiated agreement is completed by December 31, 2009, then the project is subject to 2009 prevailing wage law rather than the new prevailing wage laws that go into effect on January 1, 2010.

If a project is bid or a prime contract signed after December 31, 2009, and the total estimated project cost of the public infrastructure portion of the project is at least $25,000, then a prevailing wage rate determination is required for the public portion of the project.
At what point in the timeline of a publicly funded private construction project is a prevailing wage rate determination required for a project that exceeds the new $1,000,000 threshold? What is the effective date of the new law §66.0904, Statutes Publicly funded private construction project?
Under §66.0904, Stats., a prevailing wage rate determination is required for a project that receives at least $1 million in direct financial assistance from a local governmental unit and the project is let for bids or prime contracts are signed after December 31, 2009. So if a developer or owner receives the public funding, i.e., the funds are made available, in December 2009 and the prime contract is signed in 2010 or later the project is subject to the new law. If the developer or owner receives the public funding in January 2010 or later and the prime contract for the project was signed and the commitment of funds was in 2009 or earlier, the project is not subject to the new law and does not require a prevailing wage rate determination.
Is a project exempt from the "Publicly Funded Private Construction Project" designation if the contract between the developer and general contractor is signed in 2009 and the public funds are made available after January 1, 2010?
For projects which are subject to bidding, if the request for bid is issued after January 1, 2010 and at least $1,000,000 in direct financial assistance is committed as of the date that the request for bids is issued, then the developer or owner must obtain a prevailing wage rate determination for the project under the new prevailing wage law, §66.0904, Stats.

For projects which are covered by negotiated contracts, if the agreement is made after January 1, 2010, as shown by a signed contract or other evidence of an agreement, and for which at least $1,000,000 in direct financial assistance is committed as of the date that the negotiated agreement has been signed by all of the parties to the agreement, then the developer or owner must obtain a prevailing wage rate determination for the project under the new prevailing wage law, §66.0904, Stats.
Assume we are post January 1, 2010, what if a project is initially totally privately financed, but during the life of the project requests and receives financial assistance from a local government unit because one of the private sources dries up. Could a project that was initially totally private take on prevailing wage requirements due to an additional public funding source mid-project?
Normally, "No." When the prime contract is signed, the project is wholly funded by private money and no infrastructure will be dedicated to a local governmental unit for its ownership and maintenance, the project is not subject to §66.0904, Statutes, and state prevailing wage requirements. In the rare instance where a project initially has the appearance of being privately funded but a local governmental unit has actually entered into agreements to commit future funds to the project, the project would be covered by §66.0904 Stats., if the funds ultimately totaled at least $1,000,000.
If a local governmental unit makes a loan with repayment obligations to a developer/owner of real property under its revolving loan fund is that loan counted towards the $1 million of direct financial assistance required under §66.0904 Publicly funded private construction project statute?
If a local governmental unit loans money to a private entity at commercial rates the local governmental unit is doing nothing more than acting as a banker. The local governmental unit has not provided any monetary support to the private entity undertaking the project and the face value of the loan would not count as "direct financial assistance." On the other hand, if the local governmental unit loans the money to the private entity at no interest or at substantially lower than commercial rates then the amount of interest saved by the private entity would count as "direct financial assistance" from the local governmental unit. For instance, if a local governmental unit makes a loan to a private entity at 2% less than the going rate for a similar loan with a financial institution, the local governmental unit would have to loan $5 million for 20 years in order to reach the $1 million threshold.
How do you determine that a local governmental unit's loan rate is below the commercial rate and therefore constitutes direct financial assistance?
If lending institutions in Wisconsin would offer a similar loan at a higher rate at the time the local governmental unit makes the loan to the public entity, then the difference in lending rates applied to the principal over the term of the loan amounts to the direct financial assistance.
Does direct financial assistance include WHEDA (Wisconsin Housing & Economic Development Authority) or other State of Wisconsin financial assistance?
If the $1 million of funding comes directly from WHEDA or another state agency to the developer or owner of a private project, the project is not subject to prevailing wage laws. If WHEDA or another state agency is the original source of the $1 million of funding, but the funding is allocated through a local governmental unit to the developer/owner, then that project is subject to §66.0904, Stats., the publicly funded private construction project provisions.
Are projects under the tax increment finance law (i.e., TIFs) included under the new law?
It depends on the project. If the developer, investor, or owner of a construction project in a TIF receives at least $1,000,000 of direct financial assistance from a local governmental unit and the project does not fall under any of the residential exclusions, then the project is subject to the new publicly funded private construction project law (§66.0904, Stats.). If the developer, investor or owner of a construction project in a TIF receives less than $1,000,000 of direct financial assistance or no assistance at all, but constructs a road, street, bridge, sanitary sewer, or water main project that will be dedicated to a local governmental unit for its ownership or maintenance and the project has a total estimated project cost of at least $25,000, the project is subject to the local governmental unit prevailing wage law (§66.0903, Stats.).
If a local governmental unit pays more than $1,000,000 for infrastructure, such as roads and sewers, in a tax increment finance district, are subsequent private construction projects constructed within the district that receive no money directly automatically subject to prevailing wage requirements?
No. Regardless of whether a project is located within a tax increment finance (TIF) district, prevailing wage requirements only apply to a private construction project that receives $1 million or more of direct financial assistance from a local governmental unit. In this instance, the private construction project received no direct financial assistance from the local governmental unit; so the project within the TIF is not subject to prevailing wage under §66.0904, Stats.. The infrastructure that the local governmental unit constructs within the TIF is subject to prevailing wage under §66.0903, Stats.
What are the guidelines the DWD will use to determine which projects are covered?
The Department of Workforce Development (DWD) will look to the statutory requirements found in the Applicability and No applicability provisions of each of the laws over which DWD has jurisdiction. For §66.0903 Municipal prevailing wage and hour scales, this would be §§66.0903(2) and (5), Stats. For §66.0904 Publicly funded private construction projects, this would be §§66.0904(1)(i) and (5), Stats. For §103.49 Wage rate on state work this would be §§103.49(1m) and (3g), Stat.
How does an employer/contractor file its payroll records electronically with the Department of Workforce Development?
Employers/contractors/subcontractors should go to the prevailing wage website to determine which of the three available electronic filing methods it wishes to use to upload its certified payroll records with the Department of Workforce Development. (Web address: http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/er/prevailing_wage_rate/default.htm)
What information from the payroll records will appear on the website?
The Department of Workforce Development website will display the employer name, prevailing wage project determination number, job classification of each employee, along with that employee's hours worked, hourly rate paid and fringe benefit rate for each week in a month. The website will not display any personally identifiable information about employees like name, address or social security number, although the employer/contractor is required to file this information with the department.
Will all contractors be required to submit their own wage records directly to the Department of Workforce Development or will the general contractor be held liable for collecting subcontractor wage records?
Effective January 1, 2010, each and every contractor on a public works project or publicly funded private construction project must comply with the state law to file payroll records electronically with the Department of Workforce Development (DWD) on a monthly basis following the electronic filing requirements. Before making a final payment, a contractor is required to receive a completed Affidavit of Compliance from its contractors. In that Affidavit, a contractor will swear that it has filed its payrolls electronically with DWD.
Will signatory contractors have to file a collective bargaining agreement for each job, or can they file it once for projects undertaken during the term of the contract?
If all persons employed by the contractor/employer on a prevailing wage project are covered under a collective bargaining agreement (cba) and the wage rates for those persons equal or exceed the designated prevailing wage rate for that project, then the contractor/employer must file the applicable cba information for each prevailing wage project.
Does the electronic reporting requirement only apply to projects awarded after January 1, 2010?
No. Starting on January 1, 2010, any contractor working on a prevailing wage project, regardless of what year the project determination was issued must comply with the new electronic reporting requirements. Because of a one-month lag, any contractor working on a prevailing wage project in January 2010, would file its first set of electronic payroll records or collective bargaining agreement information with the DWD by the end of the first week of February 2010.
If the collective bargaining agreement rate prevails, how does a contractor know what the "prevailing hours of labor" are so they can pay overtime appropriately?
Generally speaking, overtime calculation is not affected by whether or not a collective bargaining agreement rate prevails. If an employee works in excess of 10 hours on a prevailing wage project Monday through Friday, or works on Saturday or Sunday, or works on various designated national holidays, the employer must pay the employee the total of (the Hourly Basic Rate listed on the prevailing wage rate determination) X 1.5 + (the Hourly Fringe Benefit listed on the prevailing wage rate determination) + (any applicable “Future Increase” listed on the prevailing wage rate determination) + (any “Premium” listed on the prevailing wage rate determination). For overtime worked in excess of 40 hours in a week, an employer must use the “blended rate” method for calculation, unless the employer has an already established “where worked” method.
How often must an employer make contributions to a bona fide plan in order for it to be considered a Bona Fide Economic Benefit?
The employer must make irrevocable contributions at least quarterly directly to the bona fide plan, trust, program or fund. But if the employer makes an annual contribution, then it must escrow money at least quarterly based on its expected annual contribution to the bona fide plan, trust, program or fund.
Are "Industry Funds" or "Contract Administration Funds" considered bona fide economic benefits?
No, these funds are not viewed as providing a direct economic benefit to an employee.
What administrative rule changes will be necessary to implement the Budget Bill changes?
The Department of Workforce Development will amend DWD 290 and DWD 294, Wis. Adm. Code, to include changes to the current laws and addition of provisions for the new publicly funded private construction project law §66.0904, Wis. Stats.  Amendments to DWD 290 were effective January 1, 2011.
What is the prevailing wage website? How do you contact the Department of Workforce Development's prevailing wage office?
The prevailing wage website is: http://dwd.wisconsin.gov/er/prevailing_wage_ rate/ and you can call the Equal Rights Division at 608-266-6861 and ask for "prevailing wage."
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